Posadas

A Maine Windjammer Sail with Teens

by Barbara Rogers

Nov 1, 2017

© Cynthia Farmer | Dreamstime

Age Specific / Teens
At anchor, the Maine coast at dusk

Photo: Stillman Rogers

 

Sailing on a Maine Windjammer is not an ordinary cruise. The wind and weather determine the course. You will rarely find shops at a port of call and on-board activities are strictly BYO. But for us and for teen-aged Mary, our week on the Angelique was a great adventure

 

After boarding in Camden, Maine, we dropped our gear in our cabins. Fortunately, our duffel bags fit at the foot of our bunk beds, because these tiny compartments below the deck had no storage space, just a few hooks on the wall. But we didn’t plan to do anything but sleep there, and the bunks were really comfortable.

Maine Windjammer Fleet

Photo: Stillman Rogers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Before we headed back up on deck, Mary, seldom seen without her phone, made a final Facebook scan, switched it off and dropped it into her duffel, “I don’t expect I’ll have WiFi out there,” she laughed, “and I’d hate to drop it overboard.” So much for my worries about her being disconnected.

Working the sails, aboard Angelique. Penobscot Bay Maine

Photo: Stillman Rogers

 

Life on a sailing ship quickly takes on its own pleasant rhythms, and we all found our favorite spots to read, talk with other passengers or just watch the shore and islands slide past. We spent most of our time on deck. When sails needed attention, we gave the crew a hand hauling lines. Mary’s favorite job was standing on the flat roof of the deckhouse, furling Angelique’s red sails — a job she became quite skilled at.

 

There were two other teens on board, and the three played rummy occasionally, but for the most part everyone hung out with their own families, which seemed why people had chosen a Windjammer cruise.

 

Meals on Board

It didn’t take Mary long to make friends with the cook, and she was soon helping chop potatoes for chowder and making salads in the dining room, where we ate family-style breakfast and dinner. Meals were plentiful and tasty, made from locally produced meats, vegetables and seafood — Angelique supports local farms and fishermen in provisioning for its cruises.

 

Buffet lunches were served on deck: creamy fish chowder and hot biscuits, hearty salads, grilled chicken and sausages, smoked salmon, cheeses, fresh fruit and fresh-baked cookies and bars. As we passed the window of the tiny galley we wondered how all this bounty could be prepared in such a tight space.

Sailing the Maine Coast

Photo: Stillman Rogers

 

Going Ashore

Each day brought a new landfall: an island village with a few crafts studios and an ice cream stand, EB White’s boathouse where he wrote his books and the beach of an uninhabited island where we spent an evening eating lobster around a campfire. An island clambake is a staple feature of almost all Windjammer cruises, an idyllic long summer evening with a glorious sunset.

 

Shore stops, however, are not the main events. Sailing is. There is nothing like flying along the water under full sail, no engine sounds, just the wind in the sails and the slap of waves. The romance of that hooked us all, from the teens to the great-grandparents on board.

 

Passengers as Crew!, Angelique, Maine coast

Photo: Stillman Rogers

What to Expect

There are few frills on a Windjammer. You won’t need dressy clothes — jeans, shorts and T-shirts, with a sweatshirt and rain gear, are the standard dress. Hats and sunscreen, because there’s not much shade on deck, rubber-soled shoes and something warm to sleep in pretty much does it for clothes. Bring reading material, games (there are some on board already) and your own travelers’ tales to share with other passengers. Angelique is one of only a few Windjammers that welcome younger teens or children. The Isaac H. Evans is another exception, and welcomes families with young children, as well. Some Windjammers set aside certain sailings as family cruises. You can get information on these and others from the Maine Windjammer Association.

#WhereverFamily

Insta Feed
Budget
Sep 19, 2019

Cheap Thrills in San Diego This Fall

San Diego is a great destination for families looking for fun no matter what time of year it is, but this fall, there is plenty to do for everyone — even when you have a budget. Thanks to year-round sunshine, the best way to explore this city is by heading outdoors and enjoying the beautiful weather.

Take Me to Tahiti

Mana is the life force Tahitians believe connects all things. Feel the mana for yourself on a visit to the islands of Tahiti, and sample some of these activities as you connect with the breathtaking nature of the South Pacific. Fly Air France from the United States to Tahiti in the most convenient and comfortable way and let your holiday start on board.

Travel Tips
Sep 18, 2019

End of Summer Fun

Just because the kids have gone back to school and the days have started getting shorter doesn’t mean summer fun has to end. There are still plenty of opportunities to enjoy what’s left of the dwindling season. You can extend your warm weather adventures with these activities all over the country.

Cruising
Sep 18, 2019

Hollywood Magic: Coming Soon to a Cruise Ship Near You

The movies and cruise vacations actually have a lot in common: fascinating ports of call, making friends with interesting people, new sensory experiences, the constant change of scenery. When you think about it, it’s no surprise many classic comedies and romances are set aboard cruise ships, including Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953) with Marilyn Monroe, Royal Wedding (1951), An Affair to Remember (1957) with Cary Grant, the more recent and kid-friendly Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation, and the long-running television series Love Boat.

Wherever Awards 2019

By Whereverfamily.com, the trusted travel source for the modern family, announces the winners of the Wherever Awards.

Listicles
Sep 17, 2019

Fall Wellness Getaways

There is an ever-growing number of options for wellness breaks — but it’s up to you to choose wisely in order to get the most from your experience. First, decide what kind of setting is best for facilitating an environment you find personally soothing or rejuvenating: city, forest, historic, mountain, ocean or lake? Do you want access to a yoga instructor, dance classes, hiking, cooking classes or another specific activity? Are you a solo wellness warrior, or do you prefer to travel with a partner or friends?